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The Tale of Benedict Rubio

July 3, 2013

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The Tale of Benedict Rubio

Human nature can be embarrassingly predictable. If not repeatable.

Benedict Arnold is the most well known traitor of the American Revolutionary War. He would have been famous for his successful military actions, if not for his unforgivable act of betrayal of American Officer-turned-British spy. Everyone despises a traitor. When you become a traitor to one side, the other side never can trust you either. Arnold’s duplicity earned him the hatred of his countrymen.

Just as it was hard to reconcile the image of a war hero with one of a traitor, it’s hard to reconcile the image of a Republican actively advancing the progressive cause of Ted Kennedy. Arnold’s unforgivable act of treason has often been attributed to a flawed character, but the real story is sadder and more complex. Money was clearly a factor in Arnold’s betrayal efforts.

He was a power hungry individual. He was charismatic. Intelligent. He also lacked integrity. He was the hot-tempered subordinate to Overall Commander George Washington. A hero of the battlefields. He was an ambitious man like Hamilton or Jefferson but he was not honored and respected as they were.

Over time, he also gained contempt. He was infuriated by what he saw as ‘politically motivated accusations’ that he had misused his position of power. Responding to harsh criticism from Tea Party activists and conservatives, watch Rubio’s feeble attempt to defend ‘accusations’ himself. Unaware of his deep unhappiness, Washington granted Arnold command of West Point, a crucial defense.

In secret code letters, Arnold plotted to turn over the U.S. post at West Point and strike a decisive blow to the American rebellion for 20,000 British pounds (as much as $3 million in today’s dollars). Plans were intercepted. Plot foiled. Arnold escaped to British lines. The nation quickly turned against its hero. Washington knew they had to forever associate him with treason. With astonishing speed, his name was linked with Satan’s, an example for anyone tempted to switch sides.

Because of the particular circumstances of this war, in which loyalists to the Crown could pass themselves off as Continental officers, leaders worried about traitors in their ranks. By asking officers to sign loyalty oaths, the command hoped to force the issue with suspected sympathizers. Tragically, Arnold, unlike Washington, never gained control of his darker, selfish side.

Nobody likes a traitor, even if he’s your traitor. The tragedy of Benedict Arnold is that his incredible acts on behalf of the cause of liberty have been washed away. Panderer’s and turncoat’s break the circle of trust. Rubio took command and stood front-and-center and betrayed the trust of those who elected him. His betrayal was not based on a change in his personal ideology. He lied. And, then was ‘outed‘.

To get elected in 2009, Marco Rubio stated: “I am strongly against amnesty. The most important thing we need to do is enforce our existing laws…” After he joined the side of the patriots to win an election, Rubio switched sides. Tea Party warriors elected him to stand firm on Immigration and, once in Washington, to stand up to Obama, not collude with him.

Fortunately for America, Arnold’s attempt to sell out the Americans did not work. And now, our national sovereignty from the enemies within is at stake again. If Benedict Arnold had lived a life of integrity and had not chosen to betray his country, his life would have turned out differently. He could have been listed as one of the greatest heroes of the Revolutionary War, instead of being the greatest traitor.

If history is accurate, when Washington learned of Arnold’s betrayal, he immediately dispatched Alexander Hamilton to go after Arnold. When a personal aid walked in his room, Washington murmured: “Arnold has betrayed me. Whom can we trust now?” Arnold never returned to the United States. He wrote a friend shortly before death, with obscurity in exile; “I’m comfortable but not sufficiently elevated to be the object of envy and distinction.”

That was over 233 years ago. History is always a cautionary tale.

Immigration is second only to Obamacare as the most consequential policy issue to the future of the country and conservatism. And Rubio has indeed betrayed the trust of the Tea Party. Should we survive this progressive assault until 2016, my gut tells me that, if given another chance in office, a different battlefield warrior, Colonel Allen West won’t disappoint.

Benedict Arnold – American Revolutionary War Major general who defected to the British Army.

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